Tag Archives: children’s literature

Gayle’s Gable

I ran across Erin Hunter’s Power of Three: The Sight and picked it up out of curiosity. I discovered that Erin Hunter is not one author but three and they have written several Warrior series, with Power of Three being the latest. The Sight is the first novel of this series. The novels center on several tribes of cats living in the wild. An author note mentioned Hunter’s interest in astrology and standing stones, so I was curious to see if this came through in her(their) story. The ancestral cats, the Star Clan, contact certain members of the tribes, usually the medicine cat. Other than that, the story focused on relationships between the tribes and happenings within a particular tribe. Survival, outside threats, and conflicts between tribes serve as common themes and storylines. Are any of you familiar with the various Warrior series? Let me know what you thought.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Gayle's Gable

Gayle’s Gable

Twists and turns fill this Amazon adventure as Jake Lansa joins his father on a jaguar expedition in Brazil. Roland Smith’s list of characters vary as much as the rain forest creatures around them. Flanna—Jake’s father’s girlfriend that he neglected to mention. Silver—the mysterious boat owner who is a little too eager to help them. The man with the scar—people get hurt when he’s around. Jake’s father searches for jaguars, but Silver seems to be searching for something else and when armed men appear in the camp, Jake finds himself caught in the middle. Explore the rain forest this summer with Smith’s Jaguar.

Leave a comment

Filed under Gayle's Gable

Gayle’s Gable

For you Ranger’s Apprentice fans, John Flanagan has authored a new series called Brotherband Chronicles. The Outcasts, the premiere novel of the series, takes place in Skandia, but our new hero, Hal, has Araluen blood in his veins. This novel walks us through Skandian brotherband training which prepares boys for their adult roles as Skandian sailors and warriors. Young men are divided into small groups or brotherbands that train and compete with one another. Team leaders are chosen and then choose their teams, much like a pick-up game of football. A group of outcasts stand unchosen. Unwanted, they create a team of their own, the Herons, and choose Hal as their leader. Each boy brings a unique gift or ability to the team, but will it be enough to defeat the sheer size and athleticism of the Sharks and Wolves teams?

Also out is Flanagan’s The Ranger’s Apprentice: The Lost Stories which allows the followers of this series a last opportunity to wrap up loose ends and to say good-bye to some much-loved characters.

Leave a comment

Filed under Gayle's Gable

Gayle’s Gable

This adventure/fantasy story whisks the reader into the exotic, mythological tales of India. In The Iron Ring, Lloyd Alexander brings his hero, young King Tamar, through innumerable challenges which shake his world, one in which the warrior’s code of honor is everything. Honor, caste, dignity. All are in question and Tamar struggles to redefine his understanding of honor, the warrior’s code, and how, he, as king, should live and govern. What will become Tamar’s new definition of honor? Alexander weaves a bit of magic, mischief, and mystery into this Indian tale.

Leave a comment

Filed under Gayle's Gable

Gayle’s Gable

Tentacles, Roland Smith’s sequel to Cryptid Hunters, sends the Wolfe team hunting for Architeuthis, the giant squid. However, Noah Blackwood is hunting the Wolfe team and only Grace is safe. Smith’s character, Dr. Ted Bronson, rivals Ian Fleming’s Q as some incredible technology appears in the novel. I love the sonic cannons. What could you invent that would help the Wolfe team in their quests for cryptids and in their ongoing struggle with Dr. Blackwood?

Leave a comment

Filed under Gayle's Gable

Gayle’s Gable

When the Monroe family discovers a baby rabbit during a scary movie at the theater, life turns into a horror story for family pets, Chester the cat and Harold the dog. White vegetables, drained of all juice, appear in strange places. The fridge opens and closes in the middle of the night. Is the new bunny a bunny at all—or something far different? Chester’s nerves strain to the breaking point. Will he and the fresh produce survive? Join Harold as he relates a tale for the century in James and Deborah Howe’s Bunnicula.

Leave a comment

Filed under Gayle's Gable

Gayle’s Gable

Markus Zusak’s Book Thief holds some of the best writing I have ever read. Each page paints pictures in your mind. Zusak’s novel, a Holocaust story, endeavors to show the good that existed within the Germany of World War II and the country’s struggle to break the oppression of Hitler and the Nazis. In an interesting twist, author Zusak allows Death to narrate the story. Older readers (and parents) will not want to miss this one.

Leave a comment

Filed under Gayle's Gable